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#cwcon2011 – CCO Notable Google Analytics

This chart features the number of site visitors to Computers and Composition Online since January 1, 2011.

#cwcon 2011 – Collaborative Authorship at CCO

This post is the first of several related to the Computers and Writing 2011 panel entitled  ”Online Journal Administration: The Editorial Mentor and a More Inclusive Future for Scholarly Publishing,” which will take place on May 20th at 11:45 am.  I’ll provide a series of examples that panelist mention in their presentations relating their work on Computers and Composition Online.  This first post features two collaboratively produced pieces in recent issues of the journal.  I worked on the above piece with author Dirk Remely from Kent State University. This great piece addresses his students’ work with SecondLIfe in a business writing class.  I helped produce the online interface for what was originally a text-based piece.

This piece was originally authored by Jeanie Parker-Beard.  Again, in it’s original form, it was essentially a text-based piece.  With the assistance of Brittany Barger Cottrill, the piece was transformed into a wonderful online article that functions well in an online environment.

These are just two examples of how collaboration has led to the publication of quality pieces of online scholarship that display of blend of technical and scholarly expertise.

Call for Nominations: Computers and Composition Awards

Computers and Composition Call for Nominations

Computers and Composition is now accepting nominations for awards in five categories. Award titles and descriptions may be viewed below, and to see complete listings of past recipients, visit our web site http://computersandcomposition.osu.edu/html/awards.htm

Dates of eligibility for all awards are January 1 through December 31 of 2010. Recipients will be honored at this year’s Computers and Writing Conference in Ann Arbor. Queries can be directed to Kris Blair kblair@bsu.edu. The deadline for all nominations is March 15, 2011.

Computers and Composition Charles Moran Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Field

The Charles Moran Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Field, inaugurated in 2003 in honor of the 20th anniversary of Computers and Composition, recognizes exemplary scholarship and professional service to the field of computers and writing.  The award celebrates the first 20 years of the journal (1983-2003) in which Charles Moran not only contributed over 30 publications (books, articles, chapters) to the profession but also supported the growth of the journal and field in multiple ways as a valued member of the Computers and Composition Editorial Board. We can think of no other person who better exemplifies what it means to be an esteemed scholar and colleague in these rapidly changing times of the information age. The Charles Moran Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Field will be given at the Computers and Writing Conference.

Please send letters of nomination for the Charles Moran Award, outlining the candidate’s ongoing contributions to the field in scholarship and service by March 15 to:

Kris Blair

Charles Moran Award

Department of English

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, OH 43403

Computers and Composition Hugh Burns Best Dissertation Award

To acknowledge and support the growth and acceptance of scholarship, research, and teaching in our field, we present on an annual basis the Computers and Composition Hugh Burns and Ellen Nold Awards. The Hugh Burns Award is presented annually for the best dissertation in Computers and Composition Studies. Computers and Composition will honor the winner during an awards presentation held during the Computers and Writing Conference. Deadline for nominations is March 15. Send nominations for the Hugh Burns Award to:

Kris Blair

Hugh Burns Award

Department of English

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, OH 43403

Computers and Composition Ellen Nold Best Article Award

To acknowledge and support the growth and acceptance of scholarship, research, and teaching in our field, we present on an annual basis the Computers and Composition Hugh Burns and Ellen Nold Awards. The Ellen Nold Award is presented annually for the best article in computers and composition studies. Computers and Composition will honor the winner during an awards presentation held during the Computers and Writing Conference. Deadline for nominations is March 15. Send nominations for the Ellen Nold Award to:

Kris Blair

Ellen Nold Award

Department of English

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, OH 43403

Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award

To acknowledge and support the growth and acceptance of scholarship, research, and teaching in our field, we present on an annual basis the Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award. The award honors book-length works that contribute in substantial and innovative ways to the field of computers and composition. In recognition of the changing nature of publications in computers and composition research, theory, and practice, the Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award is open to not only printed and bound books but also large hypertexts, multimedia programs, and Web sites. The Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award complements existing awards for best article (the Ellen Nold Award) and best dissertation (the Hugh Burns Award). Computers and Composition will honor the winner during an awards presentation held during the Computers and Writing Conference. To nominate a book for the Distinguished Book Award, the nominator must write a letter outlining the ways in which the work contributes to scholarship, research, and teaching in computers and composition, and submit the letter and three copies of the book (or arrange to have the publisher send three copies of the book). Potential categories of emphasis for nomination include originality of research and/or application, methodological sophistication, and scope of work.  Deadline for nominations is March 15. Send nominations for the Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award to:

Kris Blair

Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award

Department of English

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, OH 43403

Computers and Composition Michelle Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award

The Computers and Composition Michelle Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award was inaugurated in 2006 to recognize the creation of outstanding digital productions, digital environments, and/or digital media scholarship. It acknowledges that any single mode of communication, including the alphabetic, can represent only a portion of meaning that authors/designers might want to convey to audiences. As does our field, this award recognizes the intellectual and creative effort that goes into such work and celebrates the scholarly potential of digital media texts and environments that may include visuals, video animation, and/or sound, as well as printed words. This award is dedicated to Michelle Kendrick, who passed away in 2006. Her outstanding scholarship continues to make its mark on the field. Deadline for nominations is March 15. Send nominations for the Computers and Composition Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award to:

Kris Blair

Digital Production/Scholarship Award

Department of English

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, OH 43403

CFP: C&C Online Spring 2012

Call for Papers: Ethics in a Digital Age: Ethics, and Digital Media in the Writing Classroom

Special Issue of Computers and Composition Online for Spring 2012

Guest Editor: Toby F. Coley

While ethics has been implicitly at the center of pedagogies of digital media use for some time, extending the conversation through explicit venues creates an opportunity to explore how digital media make us aware of “new considerations that are ethically relevant to familiar ethical issues—and perhaps confront us with distinctively new sorts of ethical issues as such (Ess, 2009). These new challenges, McKee and Porter (2009) argue, include issues of blurred boundaries between public and private and researcher (and teacher) positioning to name just two.  Extensive scholarship details the complexities and connections between ethics in the writing classroom as well as ethics and research, but conversations specifically related to the ethical dimensions of digital media in the writing classroom are less prevalent.

The ethical implications of digital media use cover a range of issues from access, anonymity, consent, and preference, to privacy and security.  Further examples of ethical concerns include the conflation of public digital spaces with private student voice, the use and attribution of knowledge found in digital spaces, and whether students have the access and the knowledge—functional literacy (Selber, 2004)—to use such digital media in rhetorically savvy ways.

In this special issue, contributors are invited to explore the ways in which ethics overlaps with, comes into contact with, complicates, and underscores pedagogies of digital media use in the writing classroom and administration of writing programs.  Webtexts should offer theories, pose questions, explore practices, and identify concerns related—but not limited—to the various sections of the journal:

Theory and Practice:

·      the roles that ethics plays in the implementation of digital media into curricula and writing programs

·      the limits of digital media on students, teachers, and administrators.

·      the challenges and new concerns that digital media raise for ethical awareness

·      what might it mean to “ethically” use digital media?

·      theories of ethical digital media integration

·      what is ethics in a digitally-mediated writing classroom?

·      historical perspectives on digital media and ethics

·      administrative challenges and successes related to use

·      future challenges for digitally-mediated classrooms

Virtual Classroom:

·      practices, exercises, assignments, and narratives exploring how digital media encourage ethical awareness

·      case-studies, classroom practices, and how-to texts related to the topic

·      Pedagogical explorations and challenges

·      Issues in classroom research

·      Training teaching assistants in ethical digital media use

Professional Development

·      professional development opportunities for digital media use and their ethical dimensions

·      administrative support for digital technologies in the classroom

·      how practices are shared by colleagues and students

·      interviews with professionals in the field

Book Reviews

This section of the journal offers opportunities for reviews of print and electronic books, software, digital media, and other technologies related to digital media use and ethics.  If you have a specific text/technology in mind, feel free to query the editor.

Queries and proposals should be sent to Toby Coley at tfcoley@bgsu.edu.  Proposals for the “Theory and Practice” and “Virtual Classroom” sections should be no more than 500 words.  Accepted articles should be webtexts only, no word processor documents please.  Webtexts should be created using HTML and CSS via website creation software such as Kompozer, Dreamweaver, etc., and tailored specifically for the text, not using prebuilt templates.

·      Proposals need to be received by May 1, 2011 in order to allow time for peer review.

·      Webtexts of accepted proposals are due Sept. 1, 2011

·      Revisions are due by Dec. 1, 2011

Call for Proposals: 2011 Graduate Research Network

The Graduate Research Network (GRN) invites proposals for its 2011 workshop, May 19, 2011, at the Computers and Writing Conference hosted by the University of Michigan.  The C&W Graduate Research Network is an all-day pre-conference event, open to all registered conference participants at no charge. Roundtable discussions group those with similar interests and discussion leaders who facilitate discussion and offer suggestions for developing research projects and for finding suitable venues for publication.  We encourage anyone interested or involved in graduate education and scholarship–students, professors, mentors, and interested others–to participate in this important event. The GRN welcomes those pursuing work at any stage, from those just beginning to consider ideas to those whose projects are ready to pursue publication. Participants are also invited to apply for travel funding through the CW/GRN Travel Grant Fund. Deadline for submissions is April 25, 2011.  For more information or to submit a proposal, visit our Web site at http://class.georgiasouthern.edu/writling/GRN/2011/index.html or email Janice Walker at  jwalker@georgiasouthern.edu.

Computers and Composition Online Interface Updated

CCO New InterfaceThe staff at C&C Online are proud to announce the launch of our new journal interface.  For the last several months, we have been hard at work recoding the journal interface in W3Cs compliant HTML, refreshing its visual design, and refining its navigation for better usability.  While we have done significant internal testing to ensure the stability of the interface across multiple browsers, we do invite you to contact us if you experience any problems with the new interface or if you have any suggestions for its improvement.

We hope that you enjoy the new interface!  Be on the look out for our fall 2010 issue, which will launch sometime in the next few weeks.

CCCCs Computer Connection CFP aka CCCC(CC)

While the tension is still pretty thick in anticipation of CCCCs acceptance notifications coming out soon, I thought I’d remind everyone that the CFP for the Computer Connection at CCCCs has now come out.  Regardless of whether or not your CCCCs proposal is accepted or not, if you have any interest in presenting on some tech related issue in rhetoric and/or composition, I would strongly encourage you to look into this really great – and under-marketed – part of CCCCs.  I had the good fortune of participating last year in Louisville, and it was a wonderful experience.  Audio and Video equipment are provided to every speaker along with internet access – which is quite unusual for CCCCs – and the panels are usually well attended.  Here is the official CFP:

The Computer Connection, a project of the CCCC Committee on Computers in Composition (7Cs), seeks submissions for short presentations and workshops to be delivered at the Conference on College Composition and Communication in Atlanta, GA, April 6-9, 2011. Each year the Computer Connection hosts many excellent presentations, covering a broad range of topics including presentations on particular classroom practices, using specific software tools, institutional and administrative practices, new online resources, content management systems, open source tools and resources, and usability and remediation in online environments. The 7Cs committee once again invites proposals for presentations so that we can share our expertise and provide engaging, dynamic demonstrations of how we use technology as teachers and scholars. This is a very good opportunity for people who are new to the conference to give a shorter presentation (15 – 25 minutes) in an intimate, dialogue-facilitating environment. Each year, the CC has featured a mix of new folks, established scholars, and graduate students (although certainly some of our presenters fit more than one of those categories). The audience tends to be small but very engaged and ranges from postsecondary writing and communication teachers eager to learn new strategies for using computers and the Internet in their classes to technorhetoricians interested in cutting edge tools and technologies. Computer Connection presentations are not subject to the CCCC “one speaking role” rule. Computer Connection proposals are blind reviewed by a panel of referees constituted by the 7Cs. An LCD projector for display, speakers for sound, and a live Internet connection will be available. If you are interested, please email your name and presentation proposal (including a title and brief description) to the coordinator (Douglas Eyman – eymand@gmail.com) by October 15, 2010. Feel free to email if you have any questions.

Open Access Online Journals in Rhet/Comp

I came upon this helpful list of open access online journals today:

http://compfaqs.org/Free-accessOnlineJournals/HomePage

CFP: Great Plains Alliance for Computers and Writing

Proposals are now being accepted for the 13th annual GPACW, which will be held on the campuse of North Dakota State University the weekend of October 8 – 9, 2010.  The deadline for electronic proposals is August 15th.

Specific details for the conference can be found here:

http://www.socialmedia.ndsu.nodak.edu/?page_id=20

Google Books and the Digital Humanities

Inside Higher Ed has an interesting story running today addressing the ways in which people in the humanities are using the ever-increasing storehouse of digital books provided by Google to conduct research projects that would otherwise be nearly impossible.  For example, they mention how one group of folks is write a computer program that will scan through all of the Victorian literature available on Google Books to look for specific types of religious references in order to test the theory that the Victorian Era marked a significant decline in religiosity for England.  Google is even funding some of this kind of research as a means of promoting the academic potential of this expanding database of cultural material.

I think this article really gets at how new media are effecting the humanities.  It wasn’t too long ago that much of an English professor’s entire career could be spent reading analyzing one author – or even one book – deeply and closely.  With the advent of digital resources like Google Books, however, one might be encouraged to look more quantitatively at literature, searching for revealing patterns across large bodies of literature.

Here’s the link to the article for more info:

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/07/14/google

google

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